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    • 08/21/2024
    • 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
    • VIRTUAL
    Register

    Teaching the 3MBS formal meditation practice to individual psychotherapy clients is a pragmatic way for aspiring MBCT teachers to begin the process of MBCT Teacher Training (MTT). Like our clients, practitioners have full lives and need practical ways to cultivate and maintain new skills.  In this one-hour training, clinicians will be introduced to a three step Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) meditation practice, the “3-Minute Breathing Space (3MBS)” – both regular and responsive. Whereas the regular version is to be practiced at scheduled times, the responsive (aka coping) version is for times of discomfort and distress. The inclusion of two versions of the 3MBS reduces the risk that clients will only practice with the very avoidant and "doing" mode of mind  that perpetuates emotional disorder symptoms. Such doing can take the form of perseverative cognition including worrying, ruminative brooding, and obsessing. Over the course of the full MBCT program clients with transdiagnostic conditions (i.e., anxiety, mood, and related) learn to identify maladaptive covert mental processes and intentionally "re-enter" everyday life after practice with attention toward generalizing skills in the cognitive, physiological, and behavioral realms. This training will focus on the behavioral realm of re-entry and how to offer a treatment rationale to motivate practice. Future trainings in this series will cover additional formal MBCT practices.

    The 3MBS provides a practical beginning for teaching MBCT competently. It is a 3 step practice that is considered the “spine” of the MBCT program. Step 1 of the 3MBS develops and strengthens meta-cognitive awareness of thoughts, sensations, and feelings; Step 2 gathers attention around a chosen attentional anchor (e.g., breath, sound, touch, etc.) suited to the individual client being guided in practice; Step 3 broadens the attentional field and guides one to “befriend” experience as it is rather than "fight" or otherwise escape it. Efforts to avoid internal experiences only activate stress physiology and exacerbate symptoms.

    The 3MBS is considered the spine of MBCT training for many reasons that are further described in the MBCT protocol manual and associated workbook (see also suggested readings and www.philabta.org/EBP articles for more). The 3MBS is anecdotally reported as the most-practiced meditation by MBCT students, probably because it is brief and contains essential elements that are foundational to the range of benefits linked to the MBCT program (Segal et al., 2013). Such benefits include enhancing metacognition transdiagnostically, compassion, and preventing relapse of mood disorders to date.

    Attendees will observe an approach for enhancing competence teaching MBCT that is applicable to all formal practices included in the program. All will receive resources for practicing the 3MBS personally and  with their clients in the month following this training. Participants are asked to identify challenges and identify questions through reflective practice that will be addressed in this and follow-up CE events designed to support competence teaching MBCT practices in individual psychotherapy sessions.

    Suggested reading

    The Mindful Way Workbook: An 8-Week Program to Free Yourself from Depression and Emotional Distress.

    Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression, Second Edition 2nd Edition

    Mindfulness-Based Interventions - Teaching Assessment Criteria (MBI-TAC) 

    Baer, R., Crane, C., Miller, E., & Kuyken, W. (2019). Doing no harm in mindfulness-based programs: conceptual issues and empirical findings. Clinical psychology review71, 101-114.

    Molnar, C. (June, 2014). Peer groups as a reflecting pool for enhancing wisdom. The Pennsylvania Psychologist Quarterly, pages 9-10.

    CE Learning Objectives

    Following this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1.  Describe the components of the regular 3-minute and 3-step "breathing space" MBCT practice (3MBS). 

    2.        Describe the components of the responsive MBCT 3MBS for coping with difficult emotion states practice.

    3. Observe an MBCT teacher trainer who meets criteria for inclusion on the international registry [www.accessmbct.com], as both therapist and trainer, implementing the regular 3MBS practice.

    4. Describe a practice plan and two resources for developing competence delivering the 3MBS in individual psychotherapy sessions.

    About Presenter

    Chris Molnar, Ph.D., a licensed psychologist and clinical investigator, founded Mindful Exposure Therapy for Anxiety and Psychological Wellness Center (META Center) in 2007. She completed post-doctoral fellowship training in traumatic stress, neuroscience, and psycho-physiology and is an expert in the assessment and treatment of anxiety, OCD, PTSD, emotional, and stress-related conditions using evidence-based practices. She teaches both Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and has also developed adaptations for highly distressed clients, using Relational Mindfulness Practices (RBPs), to meet the needs of people in both individual and group therapy settings. At META Center, she offers integrative interventions grounded in findings about the brain, emotion, and learning to facilitate mental and behavioral habit change, even in the face of severe distress. Before founding META Center, she served as a clinical investigator and therapist supported by grants from the National Institute of Health and other agencies. She is also on the editorial board of Behavior Therapy and serves the public in many ways, through professional presentations, workshops, publications, and affiliations.

    Target Audience

    This presentation is intended for licensed mental health professionals and advanced graduate student trainees seeking licensure. The instructional level of this presentation is BEGINNER.

    Note: This workshop does not require attendees to have a formal mindfulness practice. 

    Continuing Education

    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is also approved by the NY State Education Department to offer psychology continuing education
    • This program provides one (1) CE credit
    • PBTA is also an authorized provider of CE credits for Professional Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Clinical Social Workers licensed in the state of Pennsylvania. Non-Psychologist Licensees outside of PA & practitioners outside of the USA please confirm eligibility with your specific licensing board.
    •  APA guidelines do not permit PBTA to issue partial CE credits.
    • 09/06/2024
    • 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
    • Virtual
    Register

    This is part of PBTA's implementation series open to either those who attended previous foundational training or have read manual listed under Suggested Resources below. Video of previous training & resources for clinicians and patients will be shared with registrants. 

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent and debilitating disorder. Although effective treatments for PTSD have been identified, there are barriers to both delivering and receiving these treatments. From the patient perspective, the treatments are time consuming (e.g., number of sessions and between session assignments), which leads to nearly one third of patients dropping out of treatment prematurely.  Written Exposure Therapy (WET; Sloan & Marx, 2019) represents an alternative, evidence-based PTSD treatment approach that is efficient, effective, associated with low treatment dropout rates (e.g., less than 10%), and works for a variety of individuals with PTSD.

    This workshop is part of PBTA's implementation series and serves as a second follow-up to the original offering on 2/2/22. Intention is to support implementation of WET. Attendees who missed the initial training are invited contingent upon reading the manual or having completed a basic level of training in WET elsewhere. Part III is an intermediate level follow-up CE event to the  initial training.  Dr. Sloan will respond to questions regarding implementation of WET with specific cases. Strategies for conceptualizing and dealing with psychiatric co-morbidity, managing avoidance, and keeping patients optimally engaged will be provided. 

    If you did not yet read Dr. Sloan's EBP article it can be accessed HERE or by pasting https://philabta.org/EBP/12902286 into browser. Registrants will also receive resources for implementation that those who completed Part I of this training have already received. BE sure to read required reading below - it can be accessed by clicking on link.

    CE Learning Objective

    Following this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1.     Using specific case examples, describe how to address challenges implementing WET.

    About Presenter

    Denise M. Sloan, Ph.D. obtained her doctorate in clinical psychology from Case Western Reserve University in 1998. She currently serves as the Associate Director, Behavioral Science Division, National Center for PTSD and a Professor of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine. She is an expert on psychosocial interventions for traumatic stress disorders and has a specific interest in efficient treatment approaches for PTSD.  Dr. Sloan conducted a series of studies that lead to the development of Written Exposure Therapy and has conducted multiple large-scale treatment studies examining the effectiveness of this treatment. She has published over 100 scientific articles and has received funding for her work from several organizations, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institute for Mental Health, Department of Defense. Dr. Sloan is past Editor of Behavior Therapy and current Editor of Journal of Traumatic Stress and a consulting editor for six scientific journals. Dr. Sloan has over 25 years of experience treating individuals with PTSD, and she has extensive experience training mental health providers in the delivery of trauma-focused treatments.

    Required Reading

    Sloan, D. M., Marx, B. P., Acierno, R., Messina, M., Muzzy, W., Gallagher, M. W., ... & Sloan, C. (2023). Written exposure therapy vs prolonged exposure therapy in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA psychiatry, 80(11), 1093-1100.

    Suggested Reading

    Sloan, D. M., & Marx, B. P. (2019). Written exposure therapy for PTSD: A brief treatment approach for mental health professionals. American Psychological Association.

    Target Audience

    This presentation is intended for licensed mental health professionals and advanced graduate student trainees seeking licensure and with some clinical experience. The instructional level of this presentation is INTERMEDIATE.

    Continuing Education

    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists*. Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
    • This program provides one (1) hour of CE credits.
    • PBTA is also an authorized provider of CE credits for Professional Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Clinical Social Workers licensed in the state of Pennsylvania.
    • Full attendance with video display is required to obtain CE credit for this program. APA guidelines do not permit PBTA to issue partial CE credits. No refunds are provided for CE programs. No exceptions allowed.
    Zoom video link will be sent to participants 48 hours before the event contingent upon membership being paid in full if membership rate was selected. NOTE: New membership period begins 2/1 of each year. Enrollment for non-members is automatically cancelled if registration fee is not paid within 15 minutes of registration.
    • 09/13/2024
    • 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
    • Virtual
    Register

    This is part of PBTA's implementation series open to either those who attended Dr. Brotto's foundational training or have read manual listed under Suggested Resources below. Video of previous training will be shared with registrants.

    Challenges implementing the 8-session Mindfulness-Based Therapy (MBT),  adapted from the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) curriculum for women with low sexual desire, will be reviewed. Mechanisms of action that research reveals are important for addressing treatment goals will be considered when considering response to challenges. Patient selection considerations, in light of research findings, for MBST will be revisited in considering response to challenges. Finally, experiential exercises that comprise MBT for women with low sexual desire will be described as will how to access such practices for professionals  interested in implementation with clients or referral to MBT & related training programs.

    About Presenter

    Lori Brotto, Ph.D. is a Professor in the UBC Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and a Registered Psychologist in Vancouver, Canada. She has been the Executive Director of the Women’s Health Research Institute of BC located at BC Women’s Hospital since 2016. Dr. Brotto holds a Canada Research Chair in Women’s Sexual Health.  She is the author of Better Sex Through Mindfulness: How Women Can Cultivate Desire and The Better Sex Through Mindfulness Workbook (October 2022). From https://www.loribrotto.com/

    Target Audience

    This workshop is designed for licensed professionals & advanced graduate students with clinical experience who anticipate seeking licensure as mental health professionals. The instructional level of this presentation is INTERMEDIATE and for participants who are currently participating in or have completed a formal Mindfulness-Based Program (MBP) such as MBCT, MBSR, MBRP, MBRE or a Compassion-Based Training programs for which mindfulness skills are foundational.

    CE Learning Objectives

    Following this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1. Describe 2 specific challenges in the implementation of Dr. Brotto’s Better Sex Through Mindfulness protocol.
    2. Describe patient-related factors that may enhance engagement with mindful sex.
    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists*. Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
    • This program provides one and a half (1.5) hours of CE credits.
    • * PBTA now offers CE to licensed psychologists licensed in the state of New York. Attestation of full attendance and provision of license number post-event required to obtain certificate that meets NY criteria for CE.
    • PBTA is also an authorized provider of CE credits for Professional Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Clinical Social Workers licensed in the state of Pennsylvania. Non-psychologist licensees in other states should confirm with their respective boards if this meets criteria for CE in their specific non-PA states.
    • Full attendance with video display is required to obtain CE credit for this program. APA guidelines do not permit PBTA to issue partial CE credits. No refunds are provided for CE programs. No exceptions allowed. Registrants can log in and cancel up to 48 hours before event when registration closes.

    Zoom video link will be sent to participants 48 hours before the event contingent upon membership being paid in full if membership rate was selected. NOTE: New membership period begins 2/1/24. Enrollment cancelled if registration fee is not paid. Past members who have not renewed membership will not be eligible for no-cost CE credits.

    Recommended Readings

    Brotto, L.A. (December, 2023). Using Mindfulness-Based Therapy to Address Low Sexual Desire in Women. PBTA's Evidence-Based Practitioner (EBP). https://philabta.org/EBP/13293520

    Brotto, L. A., & Basson, R. (2014). Group mindfulness-based therapy significantly improves sexual desire in women. Behaviour research and therapy57, 43-54.

    Brotto, L. A., Stephenson, K. R., & Zippan, N. (2022). Feasibility of an online mindfulness-based intervention for women with sexual interest/arousal disorder. Mindfulness13(3), 647-659.

    Suggested Resources

    Brotto, L. A. (2022). The Better Sex Through Mindfulness Workbook: A Guide to Cultivating Desire. Vancouver, Canada: Greystone Publishing.

    Brotto, L. A. (2018). Better Sex Through Mindfulness: How women can cultivate desire. Vancouver, Canada: Greystone Publishing.

     

    • 10/06/2024
    • 7:00 PM
    • 10/11/2024
    • 11:30 AM
    • Omega Institute, Rhinebeck NY Campus

    To register for this in-person training visit:

    https://www.eomega.org/workshops/mindful-emotional-processing

    Scroll down for CE objectives, recommended readings, and additional event description offered as background for those considering the live & in-person training at Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, NY from October 6 to 11, 2024. Contract chris@molnarpsychology.com with questions. Thank you

    Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is an adaptation of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) that integrates Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) with much-older wisdom practices. Originally developed to prevent relapse in people with recurrent depression, MBCT and its adaptations have been shown to not only reduce relapse of mood disorders, but also reduce current symptoms of PTSD, OCD, Panic, GAD, other anxiety, & related disorders (e.g., substance abuse) that can develop when disorders marked by Neuroticism remain untreated. Through effective integration of scientific findings and theory about emotional processing and the cognitive, physical, and overt and covert behavioral elements of emotion, MBCT has been shown to be a trans-therapeutic intervention of benefit to those with a range of transdiagnostic disorders. This is in part through increasing metacognition  (aka "decentering" , "deidentification", etc.) and changing how one relates habitually with unwanted internal experiences in mind and body. Moreover, the mindfulness skills developed in MBCT are foundational for the range of compassion-based interventions that also have transtherapeutic benefits for those with emotional disorders.

    The path for competently and ethically teaching MBCT to those with emotional disorders includes, but is not limited to, participation in the traditional 8-session MBCT program in the role of participant-practitioner. The participant-practitioner model of competence development supports professionals in implementing MBCT with the population they already have expertise serving. It also offers the opportunity to observe an experienced professional model implementation of the MBCT curriculum elements with people exhibiting symptoms the practitioner wants to develop skills for treating.  Importantly, the model offers opportunities for receiving feedback from peers in role plays in a consultation setting to enhance competence through deliberate practice. Practitioners will develop foundational skills for implementing all elements of the MBCT curriculum. Further, through developing the habit of formal and informal personal mindfulness practice in the role of participant they can enhance both intra- & inter-personal effectiveness in responding to challenges that arise in MBCT skill development and implementation with clients. For more about training pathway & becoming an MBCT teacher visit  https://www.mbct.com/mbct-training-pathway/ or read  article by MBCT co-developer Zindel Segal, Ph.D. at www.philabta.org/EBP about increasing access to high quality professional training Home - Access MBCT .

    In this workshop, developing clinician teachers will directly experience the MBCT treatment protocol . Professionals will also practice guiding short MBCT practices & receiving feedback from professional peer. Feedback is offered in the context of a relational mindfulness practice that invites contemplation,  reflection, &  inquiry about implementing the "Guiding Practice" Domain of the Mindfulness-Based Interventions - Teaching Assessment Criteria (MBI-TAC). The Guiding Practice Domain outlines the "bones" or essential elements of each MBCT formal practice including: the 3 step breathing space - regular & responsive versions; body scan; mindfulness of sounds and thoughts; two ways of knowing; and sitting & movement formal practices.  Professional participants  will also practice implementing the relational mindfulness practice of Mindful Case Consultation (MCC), with a focus on implementing MBCT with challenging cases while maintaining self-care.

    This live & in-person (at Omega Institute) workshop is followed by optional and virtual bi-monthly meetings with past professional graduates of this training. These occur in the year following the training to support implementation with clients.  The MBI-TAC is introduced at Omega and used in the year following the training during the optional virtual follow-up meetings during which practice teaching and offering feedback occur in the context of a relational mindfulness practice grounded in Insight Dialogue.

    Required reading throughout MBCT training.

    The Mindful Way Workbook: An 8-Week Program to Free Yourself from Depression and Emotional Distress.

    Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression, Second Edition 2nd Edition

    Mindfulness-Based Interventions - Teaching Assessment Criteria (MBI-TAC) 

    Baer, R., Crane, C., Miller, E., & Kuyken, W. (2019). Doing no harm in mindfulness-based programs: conceptual issues and empirical findings. Clinical psychology review71, 101-114.

    Suggested Reading

    Crane, R. S., Eames, C., Kuyken, W., Hastings, R. P., Williams, J. M. G., Bartley, T., ... & Surawy, C. (2013). Development and validation of the mindfulness-based interventions–teaching assessment criteria (MBI: TAC). Assessment20(6), 681-688.

    Dimidjian, S., & Segal, Z. V. (2015). Prospects for a clinical science of mindfulness-based intervention. American Psychologist, 70(7), 593.

    Kramer, G. (2007). Insight dialogue: The interpersonal path to freedom. Shambhala Publications.

    Molnar, C. (September, 2017). Playing in the ocean of awareness: Innovations in mindfulness training. The Pennsylvania Psychologist Quarterly, pages 16-17.

    Molnar, C. (June, 2014). Peer groups as a reflecting pool for enhancing wisdom. The Pennsylvania Psychologist Quarterly, pages 9-10.

    CE Learning Objectives

    Following this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1.   Describe the structural elements of four formal mindfulness practices that adhere to evidence-based Mindfulness-Based Interventions (MBIs) designed to teach participants to deconstruct emotion (pleasant or unpleasant) into the mind, body, and behavior elements.

    2.   Describe two examples of covert (mental) or overt (observable) behaviors that reflect the “doing mode of mind” that arises when there is a discrepancy between one’s desired verses actual internal state.

    3.   Describe one specific way that an unpleasant emotion state can contribute to the risk of recurrence of transdiagnostic emotional disorders.

    4.   Describe examples of typical automatic thoughts (ATs), measured by the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), and how a negative / & or depleted mood / emotion state impacts retrieval processes of ATs.

    5.   Describe two examples of the “being (present) mode of mind” that serves as an antidote for the doing mode of mind’s focus on the past & / or future.

    6.   Describe one way that the being mode of mind can reduce the risk of recurrence of distress in transdiagnostic emotional disorders associated with automatically perceiving thoughts as facts.

    7.   Describe two examples of the difference between conceptual and non-conceptual information (& associated) emotional processing and how each mode of processing can reduce or increase risk of distress and / or dysphoria.

    8.   Describe the difference between an avoidance / aversion and an approach mode of relating with experience and how each can influence level of distress and dysphoria. 

    9.   Describe the concept of ruminative brooding and how it worsens mood and predicts onset, maintenance, and recurrence of transdiagnostic emotional disorders.

    10.        Describe the components of the regular three-step "breathing space" practice and how it supports implementation of MBI skills in everyday life. 

    11.        Describe the components of the responsive three-step "breathing space" practice and how it can support the application of mindfulness skills & compassionate responding in stressful situations.

    12.        Describe how the body scan practice can be viewed as a behavioral experiment with an intention of noticing the impact of non-conceptual information processing of experience; disengagement of attention from stimuli increasing distress; and a broadening of the attentional field.

    13.        Describe MBI-adherent elements of formal sitting meditation practice and how it can be considered a micro-laboratory that supports awareness of not only sensations but also habitual mental phenomena and one’s intra-personal relationship to feeling states.

    14.        Describe three of the nine “Foundational Attitudes” that are ways of relating with experience to support both formal and informal mindfulness practice implementation.

    15.        Describe elements of the informal practice of monitoring pleasant and unpleasant events and how event logs are used to support deconstruction of emotion states into their co-arising & interacting elements.

    16.        Describe the implementation of the informal practice of logging nourishing and depleting events and how this supports identification of factors associated with relapse prevention and self-kindness intra-personally.

    17.        Describe a specific way that intention and personal values clarity can reduce barriers to development, and support strengthening, of MBCT skills implementation.

    18.        Describe how brief assessments of mindfulness, ruminative brooding and compassion can be integrated into the MBCT curriculum to motivate practice and track outcome.

    19.        Describe the physiological outcome of fighting or attempting to eliminate unwanted internal experiences and how it contrasts with allowing one’s unwanted experiences and relating with kindness to the self.

    20.        Describe two specific ways that participation in the MBCT group supports the strengthening of mindfulness and compassion in relationship with self and / or others.

    21. Describe the six teaching competence domains measured by the Mindfulness-Based Interventions - Teaching Assessment Criteria (MBI-TAC)

    22. Implement the Mindfulness-Based Interventions - Teaching Assessment Criteria (MBI-TAC) using examples from live formal MBCT sessions.

    23. Observe an MBCT teacher implement live formal MBCT sessions while in the role of a participant followed by relational mindfulness practice and feedback designed to strengthen teaching competence.

    24. Describe and observe the practice of mindful inquiry after formal guided practices with participants who meet diagnostic criteria for anxiety & related disorders.

    About Presenter

    Chris Molnar, Ph.D., a licensed psychologist and clinical investigator, founded Mindful Exposure Therapy for Anxiety and Psychological Wellness Center (META Center) in 2007. She completed post-doctoral fellowship training in traumatic stress, neuroscience, and psycho-physiology and is an expert in the assessment and treatment of anxiety, OCD, PTSD, emotional, and stress-related conditions using evidence-based practices. She teaches both Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and has also developed adaptations for highly distressed clients, using Relational Mindfulness Practices (RBPs), to meet the needs of people in both individual and group therapy settings. At META Center, she offers integrative interventions grounded in findings about the brain, emotion, and learning to facilitate mental and behavioral habit change, even in the face of severe distress. Before founding META Center, she served as a clinical investigator and therapist supported by grants from the National Institute of Health and other agencies. She is also on the editorial board of Behavior Therapy and serves the public in many ways, through professional presentations, workshops, publications, and affiliations.

    Target Audience

    This presentation is intended for licensed mental health professionals and advanced graduate student trainees seeking licensure. The instructional level of this presentation is BEGINNER.

    Note: This workshop does not require attendees to have a formal mindfulness practice. 

    Continuing Education

    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is also approved by the NY State Education Department to offer psychology continuing education
    • This program provides twenty-seven (27) CE credits, including 3 in ethics and 3 in telehealth applicable to e-passport holders through PSYPACT. There is not additional cost, above registration paid to Omega Institute, for CE credits for qualified licensed practitioners.
    • PBTA is also an authorized provider of CE credits for Professional Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Clinical Social Workers licensed in the state of Pennsylvania. Non-Psychologist Licensees outside of PA & practitioners outside of the USA please confirm eligibility with your specific licensing board.
    •  APA guidelines do not permit PBTA to issue partial CE credits.
    • 10/20/2024
    • 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
    • Virtual
    Register

    We live in turbulent times with increasing levels of stress and challenge across all age groups and across a wide range of work and life contexts. This workshop is the first of a an experiential and participatory series designed to introduce mental health professionals and those training in this field to explore how mindfulness-based approaches (MBAs) may be best used and adapted to meet the particular needs of different populations and contexts to build resilience and to ease suffering and support well-being. See  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2015.01.006  

    Mindfulness-based approaches (e.g. MBCT, MBSR, MBRP etc) as well as mindfulness-informed approaches (e.g. A.C.T.) are increasingly applied world-wide in group and one to one contexts to meet a wide variety of common emotional and psychological disorders and promote wellness. See Mindfulness-based interventions: an overall review - 10.1093/bmb/ldab005

    The workshop will invite participants to engage in some of the standard skills-based practices used in MBAs to develop emotional regulation, perspective and resilience so that the learning is experienced-based and grounded. We will use this grounded experience to better assimilate and understand how mindfulness-based approaches have their positive effect in relation to these increasingly common emotional, relational and psychological challenges. In addition we will outline how competency and integrity are being protected and encouraged in this field. See Mindfulness-Based Interventions - Teaching Assessment Criteria.

    Finally, as an aspect of integrity we will explore how adaptations of these mindfulness-based approaches may be effectively tailored and assessed to meet emerging challenges. See  https://doi.org/10.1177/21649561211068805

    Required Reading (click citation to download)

    Loucks, E. B., Crane, R. S., Sanghvi, M. A., Montero-Marin, J., Proulx, J., Brewer, J. A., & Kuyken, W. (2022). Mindfulness-based programs: why, when, and how to adapt?. Global Advances in Health and Medicine, 11, 21649561211068805.

    Suggested Reading

    Crane, R. S., Eames, C., Kuyken, W., Hastings, R. P., Williams, J. M. G., Bartley, T., ... & Surawy, C. (2013). Development and validation of the mindfulness-based interventions–teaching assessment criteria (MBI: TAC). Assessment20(6), 681-688

    Crane, R. S., Karunavira, & Griffith, G. M. (Eds.). (2021). Essential resources for mindfulness teachers. Routledge.

    Marx, R., Strauss, C., & Williamson, C. (2014). The eye of the storm: a feasibility study of an adapted Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) group intervention to manage NHS staff stress. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, 7, e18.

    J Gu, C Strauss, R Bond, and K Cavanagh (2015) How do mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and mindfulness-based stress reduction improve mental health and wellbeing? A systematic review and meta-analysis of mediation studies Clinical Psychological Review

    D Zhang, E Lee, E Mak, C Ho and S Wong, (2021) Mindfulness-based interventions: an overall review. British Medical Bulletin., N.I.H.

     CE Learning Objective:

    By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

    Describe 2 guidelines for adapting Mindfulness-Based Programs (MBPs) while maintaining integrity of the evidence-based & first generation MBSR & MBCT training programs.

    ABOUT PRESENTER

    Dh .Karunavira

    Karunavira studied Mindfulness Based Approaches at the Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice (CMRP), Bangor University gaining his M.Sc. in 2010. He currently is a senior trainer for CMRP. He is also a founding director of, ‘Mindfulhealth’, training mindfulness teachers in the UK

    He has taught mindfulness-based approaches (MBCT and MBSR) and trained mindfulness teachers within the local and wider (international) community since 2005, specialising in working with Carers, Young People, NHS Staff and traditional Arab and Far Eastern communities. He leads mindfulness retreats in the UK and across Europe. He previously trained as a Psychotherapeutic Counsellor specialising in working within the NHS with parents/carers of children with complex needs, working with this population as a Mindfulness Therapist.

     Karunavira left his initial career as Headteacher in Primary education in 1982 to pursue Buddhist studies. From 1990 he taught meditation and Buddhist studies in the UK and between 2000 and 2010 he was the spiritual director of the Brighton Buddhist Centre (UK)

    Target Audience

    This presentation is intended for licensed mental health professionals and advanced graduate student trainees seeking licensure and with some clinical experience. The instructional level of this presentation is INTERMEDIATE.

    Continuing Education

    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists*. Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
    • This program provides one (1) hour of CE credits.
    • PBTA is also an authorized provider of CE credits for Professional Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Clinical Social Workers licensed in the state of Pennsylvania.
    • ZOOM VIDEO LINK WILL BE SENT TO  REGISTRANTS 2 DAYS BEFORE & MORNING OF EVENT
    • Full attendance with video display is required to obtain CE credit for this program. APA guidelines do not permit PBTA to issue partial CE credits. No refunds are provided for CE programs. No exceptions allowed. Registrants can log in to cancel up to 4 days before the event.
    • Contact PBTAcontinuingeducation@philabta.org if you need any learning accommodations no later than one week before event.
    • * PBTA offers CE to ALL licensed psychologists in the U.S.A., including those licensed in the state of New York. If you are not licensed as a psychologist & do not practice in PA -- essentially if you are not certain about whether or not CE credits from an APA-sponsored CE provider meets criteria for ongoing education for your specific board,  please inquire with your respective licensing board to confirm.  
    • All events are Eastern Time Zone 
    • 10/21/2024
    • 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
    • Virtual (all events are Eastern time)

    THIS EVENT IS BEING RESCHEDULED FROM JULY TO A LATER DATE THAT WILL BE CONFIRMED SHORTLY. REGISTRATION IS CLOSED UNTIL NEW DATE IS CONFIRMED.

    Mindfulness-Based Programs (MBPs) and the evidence-based adaptations on which they are grounded, have been shown to be trans-therapeutic interventions of benefit to those with a range of transdiagnostic emotional disorders. One such adaptation, the 8-week Feeling Tone program, focuses on feeling tone, or vedana, the second foundation of mindfulness. The key elements of the Feeling Tone program are described in this virtual CE training, during which you will be introduced to the Buddhist Psychological Model, a framework for understanding the central role of feeling tone in perpetuating aversion and attachment. An experiential demonstration will provide the opportunity to cultivate the key skills trained in this program. 

    Required reading (Access will be given via email to registrants)

    Grabovac, A. D., Lau, M. A., & Willett, B. R. (2011). Mechanisms of mindfulness: A Buddhist psychological model. Mindfulness, 2(3), 154–166. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-011-0054-5

    Suggested Reading (click below to download)

    Williams, J. M. G., Baer, R., Batchelor, M., Crane, R. S., Cullen, C., De Wilde, K., ... & Taylor, L. (2022). What Next After MBSR/MBCT? An Open Trial of an 8-Week Follow-on Program Exploring Mindfulness of Feeling Tone (vedanā). Mindfulness13(8), 1931-1944.

    CE Learning Objectives

    Following this presentation, participants will be able to:

    Objectives (updated)

    1. Describe the skills trained in the Feeling Tone program 
    2. Explain the role of feeling tone (vedana) in perpetuating aversion and attachment using the Buddhist Psychological Model framework
    3. Experience a meditation that explores several ways of approaching feeling tone

    About Presenters

    Mark Lau, PhD, is a Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia, and a registered psychologist in private practice at the Vancouver CBT Centre.  Dr. Lau has over 25 years experience providing Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) to individuals and groups; conducting MBCT and CBT research; providing leadership in developing models of mental health care delivery including innovative ways of delivering MBCT & CBT; and, providing leadership in training and education including providing MBCT single and multi-day professional trainings across North America, Europe and Australia for mental health professionals.  Mark is also an MBCT teacher trainer/mentor with the UCSD Mindfulness-Based Professional Training Institute and is one of a handful of MBCT trainers who provide the 5-day MBCT Professional Training in North America.  He has provided MBCT & Fostering Resilience workshops to psychiatrists, physicians, UBC internal medicine residents, university research administrators and college staff.  Dr. Lau’s research interests include investigating the mechanisms underlying MBCT’s effectiveness, the development and validation of the Toronto Mindfulness Scale, and evaluating effective methods of disseminating MBCT and CBT.  He is a former Associate Editor of the journal Mindfulness.

    Andrea Grabovac, MD, FRCPC, is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia, and Co-Director of the North American Chapter of the Mindfulness integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MiCBT) Institute. She has practiced inpatient psychiatry for 20 years at Vancouver Hospital, and her outpatient work focuses on mindfulness-based treatments to treat anxiety, depression and other clinical conditions.

    For the last 15 years she has been training physicians and mental health clinicians nationally and internationally in the delivery of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy and MiCBT, both of which are evidence-based treatments for mental health conditions. She also co-facilitates 5 day Cultivating Wellbeing retreats for physicians and their spouses. She is a clinician trainer and mentor with the UCSD Mindfulness Based Professional Training Institute in California, the Center for Mindfulness Studies in Toronto, and the MiCBT Institute in Australia. She is Co-Investigator in CIHR trials comparing MBCT to CBT for sexual disorders, and has co-authored Canadian competency-based guidelines for training psychiatrists in Mindfulness Based treatments.

    She serves as Associate Editor with the journal Mindfulness, and is an active member of the International Mindfulness Integrity Network. .

    Target Audience

    This presentation is intended only for licensed mental health professionals and advanced post-doctoral trainees. The instructional level of this presentation is BEGINNER and no previous formal meditation experience is required.

    Continuing Education

    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
    • Philadelphia Behavior Therapy Association is also approved by the NY State Education Department to offer psychology continuing education
    • This program provides one (1) hour of CE credits for those who attend the training in it's entirety (not missing more than 10 minutes).
    • PBTA is also an authorized provider of CE credits for Professional Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Clinical Social Workers licensed in the state of Pennsylvania. Non-Psychologist Licensees outside of PA & practitioners outside of the USA please confirm eligibility with your specific licensing or credentialing board.
    • Full attendance with video display is required to obtain CE credit for this program. APA guidelines do not permit PBTA to issue partial CE credits. No refunds are provided for CE programs. No exceptions allowed.

Past events

07/17/2024 Implementing the Integrative STAIRCaSE Model in Psychotherapy: Case Formulation Grounded in Transtherapeutic Principles
07/15/2024 "Anger is completely normal” – Emotion regulation and stress management for family caregivers. VIRTUAL CE
06/17/2024 Psychotherapeutic support for caregivers (CGs) of people with dementia & other populations dependent upon CGs. Treatment Manual Implementation - Part 1. Virtual CE
06/05/2024 Training Equanimity through Participant Observership of the “Deeper Mindfulness” Program
05/22/2024 A Social Problem-Solving Framework for Suicide Treatment and Prevention. Lifetime Achievement Award CE Celebration: Christine Maguth Nezu, PhD, ABPP Arthur M Nezu, PhD, DHL, ABPP
04/16/2024 Honoring Marvin "Marv" Goldfried, Ph.D. with PBTA's 1st Virtual Lifetime Achievement Award & CE Celebration
04/09/2024 Telehealth Strategies for CBT with Older Adults: Virtual CE
03/06/2024 Loving-Kindness (Metta). Secular Wisdom Practices: What? For Whom? By Whom? & How to Develop Competence? Virtual CE Journal Club
02/05/2024 Using ACT to Guide Exposure Therapy Implementation: Virtual CE
02/02/2024 Mindfulness for Managing Low Sexual Desire in Women: Virtual CE
01/25/2024 Compassion Training: What Practice? For Whom? By Whom? How Long? & How to Develop Competence? Virtual CE Journal Club
12/12/2023 Mindfulness or Relaxation? Selecting and Applying Specific Change Strategies with Your Older Patients
12/06/2023 Managing Challenges in the Therapeutic Relationship in CBT. Virtual CE on 12/6/23 from 12:00 - 2:00 p.m. ET with Cory Newman, Ph.D.
10/16/2023 Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Guide Exposure Therapy
10/10/2023 Emotional Literacy & Cultivating Positive Emotions with Older Adults
09/21/2023 Parent-Based Treatment for Child Anxiety Disorders with Eli Lebowitz, Ph.D.
08/09/2023 What Practitioners of Diverse Orientations Say About Transtheoretical Principles of Change in Routine Psychotherapy Practice with Marvin Goldfried. Ph.D. & Conal Twomey, Ph.D.
06/21/2023 Culturally Responsive CBT in the Second Half of Life
06/10/2023 Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) Curriculum: The Participant-Practitioner Perspective.
06/07/2023 Embracing Enjoyment: Implementing Savoring Practices for Anxiety, Depression, and Positive Wellbeing
05/26/2023 Counteracting Worry by Savoring Positive Emotions: Outcomes and Mechanisms of a Clinical Trial.
05/22/2023 Contrast Avoidance (CA) in the real world: Addressing CA in the everyday lives of people with GAD
04/16/2023 Chronic/Recurrent Suicidality: Implementing Interpersonal Reconstructive Therapy for Conceptualization, Safety Planning, & Reconstruction
03/29/2023 Supervision Essentials for Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy 12:00 - 2:00 p.m. ET with Cory Newman, Ph.D.
01/18/2023 Written Exposure Therapy (WET) Consultation: Part II - A brief treatment approach for PTSD with Denise Sloan, Ph.D.
01/11/2023 STAIRCaSE: Transtheoretical Case Formulation for Corrective Experience with Marvin R. Goldfried, Ph.D.
12/14/2022 Self-Directed Coping Skills: The Example of Assertive Behavior: Marvin R. Goldfried, Ph.D.
12/11/2022 Interpersonal Reconstructive Therapy (IRT) Consultation: Facilitating Response to CBT - Part II.
11/12/2022 Trial-Based Cognitive Therapy (TBCT): A Transdiagnostic Approach for Modifying Dysfunctional Cognitions
11/09/2022 CBT for Chronic GI Disorders (They’re More Common than You Think!)
10/26/2022 Psychotherapy: What Holds Us Back?: Wisdom Wednesday CE with Dr. Marvin Goldfried
09/24/2022 Interpersonal Reconstructive Therapy for Facilitating Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy with Challenging Cases.
08/17/2022 Trial-Based Cognitive Therapy: Tools for collaborative symptom tracking in treatment
08/10/2022 Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) Curriculum: The Participant-Practitioner Perspective.
07/06/2022 Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy: Overview, Research Summary, and Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychedelic Harm Reduction Therapy
06/24/2022 Self-care in Challenging Times: A Communitarian Approach
04/27/2022 Future Tense: How (and Why) to Talk to Clients about Anxiety as an Advantage, VIRTUAL 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. ET
04/01/2022 Acceptance-based Behavior Therapy: Treating anxiety with mindfulness, values-based action and more
03/19/2022 ACT for Perfectionism: Translating Treatment Research to Clinical Practice
02/02/2022 A brief treatment approach for PTSD: Written Exposure Therapy
01/05/2022 Creating Inclusive Environments: Understanding Gender Identity Across the Lifespan
10/08/2021 Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) Curriculum: The 8-session Participant-Practitioner Perspective.
09/24/2021 Trial-Based Cognitive Therapy, an approach to changing core beliefs in CBT
08/18/2021 Mindfulness Out Loud and From the Bottom-Up
07/07/2021 Worry Loves to Lie: Treating Faulty Forecasting in Clients with Excessive Worry
06/04/2021 Discomfort Is My Comfort Zone: The Seductive Trap of Chronic Worry
05/19/2021 Wise Intervention Wednesday for Enhancing Wellbeing: Mindful CE Journal Club
04/02/2021 Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions (MCII) for cueing adaptive automaticity: First Friday Mindful CE Journal Club
03/05/2021 First Friday Mindful CE Journal Club Deliberate Practice of Clinical Skills: The Behavior of Ending Sessions on Time
02/12/2021 Chris Molnar, PhD - Mindfulness Out Loud to Enhance Ethical Responding: A Trans-therapeutic Relational Practice for Cueing Compassionate Behavior During Extreme Emotion States
02/05/2021 First Friday Mindful CE Journal Club: Differential Effects of Mental Training
03/13/2020 Chris Molnar, PhD The Interpersonal Mindfulness Practice of Compassionate Case Consultation in the Ethical Implementation of Mindfulness- and Compassion-Based Programs with Highly Distressed Clients
05/13/2019 PBTA Lifetime Achievement Award Presented to: Philip Kendall, PhD, ABPP
03/15/2019 Allan Tepper - Ethical Considerations Related to the Practice of Teletherapy in Pennsylvania
04/27/2018 Stephanie Mattei, PsyD - Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Beyond the Basics
01/26/2018 Brigette A Erwin, PhD and Erin Roemer, PsyD - Evidence-Based Treatment of Pediatric Treatment-Resistant OCD: Maximizing Outcomes with Intensive, Multisystemic Outpatient Treatment
11/17/2017 Clinical Networking Luncheon & Autism Update: Research, Intervention, and Transition to Adult Life
10/06/2017 Scott Glassman, PsyD - Integrating Motivational Interviewing and CBT
10/06/2017 Randy Fingerhut, PhD - Ethics & Suicide Prevention
09/15/2017 Donna Sudak, MD - Challenges in CBT Supervision
05/26/2017 Chris Molnar, PhD - Mindfulness Training for the Extreme States of Mind and Body that Drive Reactive Behaviors
10/14/2016 Melissa Hunt, PhD - CBT for Chronic GI Disorders including Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
06/09/2016 PBTA Lifetime Achievement Award presented to: Richard G Heimberg, PhD
12/04/2015 Doug Tynan, PhD and Scott Glassman, PsyD - Integrating Mental Health with Physical Healthcare/Making the Case for Behavioral Health in the New Health Care System
11/20/2015 Randy Fingerhut, PhD - Advanced Ethical Decision Making
06/22/2015 William Young, MD & Ronald Kaiser, PhD, ABPP - Migraine from the physician's and psychologist's perspective: What do mental health professionals need to know?
04/14/2015 Jeffrey Greeson, PhD - Why is mindfulness training helpful across many psychological disorders? A transdiagnostic view, and mindfulness as a transtherapeutic process
03/02/2015 Katherine Dahlsgaard, PhD - Introducing the New Anxiety Disorder: Selective Mutism
02/21/2015 Cory Newman, PhD - Back from the Brink: Using CBT to Help Suicidal Patients to Choose to Live
01/24/2015 Douglas Woods, PhD - Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT)
11/19/2014 Zindel Segal, PhD - Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy for the treatment of Mood Disorders
09/19/2014 PBTA Lifetime Achievement Award presented to: Michael J Kozak, PhD
04/30/2014 Family involvement in the treatment of chrildren with anxiety disorders
02/15/2014 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Supervision: Evidence-Informed Practices and Ethical Considerations
12/02/2013 An Introduction to Parent-Child Interaction therapy (PCIT) in community settings
11/04/2013 Stress: Mindfulness, Stress Reduction Pathways, and Health
09/27/2013 Technology, Electronic Communication, and Clinical Practice: Ethical Considerations and Best Practices for Emerging Trends and Challenges
09/14/2013 Mastering the Language of Therapy: How to Use Relational Frame Theory in Your Clinical Practice
04/20/2013 Building Clinical Competencies in Working with Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
02/16/2013 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Related Conditions
04/28/2012 Mike Femenella, PhD - Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): An Experiential Introduction
03/01/2012 Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT)
02/25/2012 Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT)
02/24/2012 Manufacturing Memories
10/24/2011 Emotion Regulation Therapy for Complex and Refractory Presentations of Anxiety and Depression
10/15/2011 The Practice of Psychology over the Internet & e-Tele Health
05/23/2011 Buried in Treasures: The Nature and Treatment of Compulsive Hoarding
05/02/2011 From the Cutting Edge Science of Fear to Psychotherapy: Exposure Therapy for Phobia and Anxiety Disorders
04/28/2011 Core Beliefs on Trial
03/02/2011 Helping Students, Teachers, and Parents Recognize and Respond Positively to Peer Bullying
11/21/2010 CBT for Pediatric OCD and Related Conditions
05/25/2010 Positive Psychology
05/17/2010 Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy for Anxiety-Related Disorders
04/26/2010 Grady Nia Project: Assessing and Treating Abused, Suicidal, Low-Income, African American Women
02/18/2010 The Practice of Dialectical Behavior Therapy
11/16/2009 Understanding and Working Better with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients
11/06/2009 Therapy with Latino Clients and Families
10/17/2009 Ethics for Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals
06/03/2009 Some Common Principles of Change in Treating Depression and Anxiety Disorders ; The Roles of Avoidance, Affective Arousal, and Cognitive/Emotional Processing
03/20/2009 The Mental Health Professional In Coerced Interrogations: Ethical And Legal Issues
02/04/2009 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Best Practices in Assessment and Intervention
11/03/2008 Sleepy, Dopey, and Grumpy: Sleep and Sleep Disturbances in Children and Adolescents
10/06/2008 Distinguishing Scientific from Pseudoscientific Mental Health Practices
09/17/2008 Becoming a Calm Mom: Using CBT Techniques to Help Moms Adjust to the First Year of Motherhood
06/04/2008 PBTA Lifetime Achievement Award & A Clinical Conversation Between Drs. Aaron T. Beck & Judith S. Beck
05/12/2008 The Role of Religion in Coping with Stress and Trauma
04/21/2008 Flexible Applications of Treatment Strategies for Anxious Youth
03/19/2008 Understanding and Treating Social Anxiety Disorder from a Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective
01/14/2008 Mindfulness and Meditation: Tools for Healing and Growth
11/05/2007 Addressing the Crisis With Nutrition and Obesity: How to Create Real Change
10/13/2007 Ethics for Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals
07/23/2007 Communicating Your Expertise Through the Media: Becoming a Media Expert / Marketing Your Practice
06/18/2007 Managing "Resistance": A Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective
05/09/2007 Hardiness, the Exception or the Rule?
03/12/2007 Obesity and the Power of the Food Environment: Rethinking the CBT Approach to Treatment
10/11/2006 Prolonged Exposure for the Treatment of PTSD
05/07/2006 Cognitive Therapy for Adult ADHD
10/15/2005 Ethics for Psychologists
04/13/2005 BT for Pediatric OCD & Related Disorders
04/07/2005 Prolonged Exposure for Chronic PTSD
11/03/2004 The "3rd Wave" of Behavior Therapy: An Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
10/13/2004 Application of Cognitive Behavioral and Motivational Interviewing Strategies in Treating Substance Abuse
04/27/2004 Cognitive Therapy of Personality Disorders

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